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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)
a pay raise, a six-hour day, a coast-wide contract, and a working hall run by us... human dignity, rank and file democracy and human dignity. but the shipowners, they thought we wanted revolution. well, at least that's what their papers said. [bell ringing] oh, yeah, here's another one. "the communist army plans the destruction of railroad and highway facilities to paralyze transportation and communication, while san francisco and the bay area are made a focal point in a red struggle for revolution and control of the government." [dramatic musical flourish] it's amazing the fear a bunch of wharf rats could stir up, and on may 9th, we went out on our first coast-wide strike, and the day of the shape-ups, the kickbacks, and the blue books was over. [light guitar music] ♪ >> ♪ step by step ♪ the longest march ♪ can be won ♪ can be won >> ♪ many stones ♪ can form an arch ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> ♪ and by union ♪ what we will ♪ can be accomplished still >> ♪ drops of water ♪ turn a mill ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> we don't intend to repeat our former
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
. and it may have been the lowest of the four elections held since u.s. forces ousted the taliban in 2001. there were also allegations of rampant fraud. >> we have seen ballot stuffing, proxy vote, underage voting, and also multiple voting. the most serious one is the ballot stuffing. our observers have observed in more than-- in around 280 centers in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur. >> reporter: afghanistan's leading election observation group called today for an independent investigation. also today president karzai spokesmen agreed that the fraud allegations warranted a second look. >> like any other election anywhere in the world this there are complaints there have been irregularities. but we are waiting for the respective organizations to investigate these complaints. and they should be the source of information to the afghan people about the existence of irregularities or fraud. >> reporter: at the same time, the afghan electoral commission criticized observer groups for being too quick to imply the election was tainted. still former foreign minister abdullah abdul
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relatively calm sea. but a few hundred miles out in the atla
. new rules on child sex abuse, and the u.s. formally ends operations in iraq. chancellor angela merkel fears east german braverynd th country's unification set an example for the world, marking the moment that the treaty was signed two decades ago, she praised the role of civil rights activists and those who escaped the regime. the german leader grew up in the east and says it is now germany's responsibility to fight globally for freedom. >> the original unification treaty was presented to today's chancellor to commemorate its signing in the same room 20 years ago. angela merkel, who grow up in east germany, was joined ere byany politicns iolved in the deal. the interior met -- for the then interim minister, signing the treaty was the high point of his career. >> we left the room together for a moment, and then we simply cried because we were moved, exhausted, and overjoyed. >> it took just 23 minutes to end four decades of communist east german rule. unification had previously been approved by east germany's parliament. chancellor merkel was present at the proedings 20 years ago. she
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could
plan to burn the islamic holy book to mark the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. the u.s. embassy in kabul has condemned the church's plan. elsewhere in afghanistan nato announced the u.s. soldier was skilled in fighting in the east on sunday. the fifth american death in afghanistan in september. also today it was widely reported that the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan has asked for 2,000 additional troops. general david petraeus wants them to join the 140,000 strong international force to help train afghan security forces. in pakistan today at least 19 people died and 40 more were wounded in a suicide bombing near a police station. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility for the car bomb in the northwestern town. a spokesman said the bombing targeted police because they encourage residents to set up militias and fight the taliban. at least 44 people have died in landslides in guatemala, and dozens more are missing. heavy rains unleashed multiple landslides this weekend including on one of the country's main highways. rescue workers struggled today to try and free
be a sign that god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the
. president obama addresses the nation as the u.s. combat mission ends in iraq. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the analysis of mark shields and david brooks. >> lehrer: and margaret warner in baghdad examines the challenges iraqis still face in their daily lives. >> woodruff: then, from mexico city, we learn the latest on the arrest of an alleged drug lord from jason beaubien of npr. >> lerher: we have another in john merrow's reports on the washington, d.c., schools. tonight he looks at a new test for teachers. >> how can you possibly have a system where the vast majority of adults are running around thinking i'm doing an excellent job when what we're producing for kids is 8% success. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown updates the story of new orleans musician and scholar michael white, five years after katrina. >> i went through a serious period of depression, of anger, of many different kinds of emotions. and then i came to realize the most valuable thing that i have i never lost. it's inside. it's that music tradition. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on to
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. that's something i add life >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your
at the white house just over three weeks ago. a state department official said today the u.s. was disappointed that israel allowed the building moratorium to expire. u.s. official middle east envoy george mitchell heads back to the region tomorrow with stops in israel and ramallah. both sides have accepted an invitation to resume talks in paris next month. >> ifill: for more on what's holding these talks together so far, we turn to ghaith al-omari, the advocacy director for the american task force on palestine, and a former advisor to president abbas. and david makovsky, senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and the co-author of "myths, illusions, and peace." for let's talk about myths, illusions and peace, gait al on ari. what happened today. why didn't the palestinians walk away from the table as they promised they would if the settlements were not frozen. >> because they realized that the price of walking out from the talks is very high s very high from a domestic strategic perspective. ultimately they have no choice. and if you want to get a palestinian state the o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)